Come, listen to the crazy cat person.

Well, I think there is a difference between loving the idea of someone and actually loving who they are.

—Elizabeth Burke

You never had to prove them wrong

realsocialskills:

When you grow up with stigma, people tell you a lot of well-meaning things that actually cause problems. When you face people treating you like you’re less of a person, someone will often say something like:

  • "You’ll prove them all wrong some day".
  • "It’s ok. You’ll show them. You’ll prove that you’re better than they ever could have imagined."

And then, when you accomplish things, it often becomes, “Well, you proved them wrong, didn’t you?”

People who say this often mean well, but this is a form of victim-blaming, and it can hurt people who believe it really badly. The truth is:
You didn’t prove them wrong. You never had to prove them wrong. They were already wrong.
Prejudice is not something you have to earn your way out of. Dehumanization isn’t your fault. You don’t have to prove that you are human in order to be human. You don’t have to have amazing accomplishments in order to prove that you have worth. Everyone has worth. People who don’t recognize yours have always been wrong.
You didn’t prove them wrong. They were already wrong. About you, and about everyone else too.
You might have to fight to be seen as a person. You might have to fight for your life and your safety and for basic respect. That’s a fight you may or may not win. It’s a fight that, no matter how hard you try or how good you are, you will never win all the way. There will still be those who hate you and see you as subhuman.
But you can be ok, anyway. You’re ok. You’re whole. You deserve better. It’s not your fault they don’t see it. It’s theirs.
You have always been a full person, fully deserving of respect and equal treatment. People who treat you as a lesser being have always been wrong.
Knowing that helps.

winnememwintuvoice:

Please Sign This Petition to the US House of Representatives and the US Senate:

We are a small, traditional tribe in Northern California, and we are struggling to survive as a culture and maintain our indigenous religious practices, which are all threatened by the U.S. government’s proposal to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet.

We were flooded out, and not compensated, with the building of Shasta Dam in 1945, and we lost many villages, burial sites and sacred sites beneath the Lake, a loss that still causes our people much heartache to this day.

This latest proposal would inundate or damage more than 40 sacred sites, including our Coming of Age ceremony grounds on the Winnemem Waywaqat (McCloud River). Representative Jim Costa, of Fresno, has introduced a bill, H.R. 4125,co-signed by a number of California Democratic Congressmen, to raise the dam. No mention of the standing debt to our people. Senator Diane Feinstein also supports the dam raise and will probably introduce a bill to authorize it soon.

You can make a difference to support Winnemem Wintu cultural survival by telling Congress not to authorize the proposal to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet. Learn more about why the dam raise must be stopped at www.shastadamraise.com.

Please boost this!  Only through your support will this project be stopped.

ununnilium:

pgdigs:

1967: Pittsburgh’s Skybus

A story of Skybus, as the Transit Expressway Revenue Line became known in the 1960s, is a chapter of shattered dreams in Pittsburgh’s public transit saga. 

It had a grand vision for superior rapid transit service that would move large crowds day and night, year in and year out. Call it a commuter’s dream.

The opportunities it presented promised a break-through in public transit technology. The system developed by Westinghouse used a dedicated elevated concrete track, rubber-tired cars and driverless operation — all were innovative concepts in 1960, the year it was conceived. 

In 1964, federal money poured in to build a demonstration track in South Park that would be 1.77 miles long. In 1965, the Transportation Systems Group unveiled the demo system for the Allegheny County Fair. According to the Post-Gazette, more than 30,000 people paid the ten-cent fair for a chance to take an air-conditioned Skybus ride around the loop during the several days of the fair. Even Walt Disney came to South Park to evaluate the Skybus system, many thought it would serve as a prototype for Disney World. 

"The system was originally named Skybus until it was discovered that Skybus was a trademark for one of the airlines," according to the Post-Gazette. "The name was then changed to Transit-Expressway and later to People-Mover when it finally evolved into a special purpose transportation system."

But People-Mover never quite moved to Pittsburgh. It was too controversial and too  ambitious, too big for the Port Authority and political factions on the city and state levels to stomach: a 92 mile long trolley line, 460+ cars at the cost of $295 million. The system was meant to connect suburbs with downtown. The Skybus route would originate in South Hills and would follow a streetcar route through Mt. Lebanon and Beechview before reaching Downtown Pittsburgh through the unused Wabash Tunnel.

Evaluations were made, papers were written and the work began, the plan was revised several times in the process. In 1976, it died because of the political stalemate and a recommendation to withdraw support from the project.

We may not have Skybus in Pittsburgh, but we do have internet to dream. Want to live commuter’s dream for a minute and take a ride on Skybus?

— Mila Sanina

factsinallcaps:

SCIENCE HAS BEEN WRONG BEFORE AND IT WILL BE WRONG AGAIN. IF YOU FAIL TO ACKNOWLEDGE THAT SCIENCE IS AN ONGOING PURSUIT OF UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD AROUND US BASED ON THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE AND NOT AN IMMUTABLE OBJECTIVE TRUTH, YOU MAY HAVE MISSED THE PURPOSE OF SCIENCE COMPLETELY. 

dragondicks:

now stop asking

dragondicks:

now stop asking

Serious Time

the-goddamn-doomguy:

Hello everybody, I’m in a bit of a bad situation right now. Normally I hate talking about my real life, but I’m in some serious financial danger. What does this have to do with any of you? Well… I was hoping you guys could help me get out of this slump. How you ask? Oh, it’s quite simple actually -

Follow me on Twitch! You see, if I can get enough activity on my twitch channel I can eventually get a twitch partnership. You see, I’ve been streaming for a little while now and I’ve discovered I really like doing it! So I thought, maybe I could become a twitch partner and get paid to do what I love! All you guys have to do is follow me on twitch and then watch me play some vidya gaems whenever I start streaming. I’ll try to make it as entertaining to watch as I can. I’ve just finished up Quake and will be playing through both officially released mission packs for it next. If you have any suggestions for what game I should stream next, feel free to send me an ask!

I hate to beg for help like this, but I really have no choice at the moment. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Every reblog and every follow on my twitch helps me a whole lot and I really appreciate it.

http://www.twitch.tv/doomed_spacemarine/profile

My fortune cookie says “If you want the rainbow, you have to tolerate the rain.” Or you could stay inside and watch the rainbow in the comfort of your home, and it’s not as good as this one.

rollforproblematic:

missrep:

The Little Girl from the 1981 LEGO Ad is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something to Say (via Women You Should Know)

 “In 1981,” explains Giordano, “LEGOs were ‘Universal Building Sets’ and that’s exactly what they were…for boys and girls. Toys are supposed to foster creativity. But nowadays, it seems that a lot more toys already have messages built into them before a child even opens the pink or blue package. In 1981, LEGOs were simple and gender-neutral, and the creativity of the child produced the message. In 2014, it’s the reverse: the toy delivers a message to the child, and this message is weirdly about gender.”

rollforproblematic:

missrep:

The Little Girl from the 1981 LEGO Ad is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something to Say (via Women You Should Know)

 “In 1981,” explains Giordano, “LEGOs were ‘Universal Building Sets’ and that’s exactly what they were…for boys and girls. Toys are supposed to foster creativity. But nowadays, it seems that a lot more toys already have messages built into them before a child even opens the pink or blue package. In 1981, LEGOs were simple and gender-neutral, and the creativity of the child produced the message. In 2014, it’s the reverse: the toy delivers a message to the child, and this message is weirdly about gender.”

nsmmm:

春

nsmmm: